How Greek Migrants Contributed to the Introduction of Barramundi to Australian Cuisine

The contribution of Greek migrants to the introduction of barramundi to modern Australian cuisine is the subject of a story on the SBS website.

According to the SBS report, Greek migrants along with Indigenous peoples helped put the particular fish in Australian dishes.

It was the Haritos family, pioneers in the Outback, who arrived in the Northern Territory about a century ago, escaping from the plights World War I left and searching to make a living. They were among many fellow Greeks who sought a haven in Australia.

The Haritos brothers, the report says, were crocodile hunters, buffalo shooters and barramundi fishermen. They learned to track and catch the fish from the Indigenous Australians, who were eating the particular fish.

After acquiring the techniques of tracking and catching the barramundi fish — learned from the Indigenous peoples — the next step was to introduce it to European Australians, not an easy task considering the unique, muddy taste of the fish.

And, indeed, they succeeded: almost 60 years ago barramundi was on the plates of Olympians who were in Australia for the 1956 Olympic Games in Melbourne. That was the first instance the barramundi actually had a successful commercial introduction to the wider Australian cuisine.

Today, barramundi features prominently on the menu in all seafood restaurants in Australia.